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tv   Deadline White House  MSNBC  February 22, 2024 1:00pm-3:00pm PST

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that being said, they are going to continue to reach out to the community here, but they are focusing more on the suburban vote, the black vote here, the female vote as well. however, these folks that i was just speaking to, especially some of the other voters, they think without their community, they cannot win michigan. even with all hands on deck here in this state. >> but let me ask you this. we have no time. donald trump would be even more staunchly on the side of israel. he would give israel more weaponry arguably than joe biden does. do they not see a difference there? >> reporter: i asked them that exact question. i pushed back. they said how much worse could it get. and maybe we need to suffer to send a message about the political institutions in this country. we need to suffer to send a message we don't agree with the
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two-party system. this is what they are telling me. that message is not voting for reelection of president biden is and to suffer through four years of donald trump. >> yasmin vossoughian, thank you so much. that's going to do it for me. "deadline: white house" starts right now. hi, everyone. it's 4:00 here in new york. a ambassador who lived his life out of the public eye with no photos, is at the center of a political fire storm as the justice department and attorneys for former fbi informant alexander smirnov spar over keeping him in custody. calling him a serious flight risk. top republicans are facing questions today about just how the claims of someone with ties to russian intelligence became the basis for an impeachment inquiry into the president. "the new york times" says, for more than a decade, he played a
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double game, giving the fbi tantalizing visibility into a cast of oligarchs and public officials while offering himself as a consultant with a skill set. some of the same people he was keeping tabs on. then he stepped over the line. in 2020, smirnov told his fbi handlers prosecutors say was a brazen lie. that the oligarch owner of the ukrainian energy company had arranged to pay $5 million the in bribes to both president biden and his son hunter. the explosive claim was leaked to republicans who made mr. smirnov's allegations a center piece of their now stalled effort to impeach president biden. apparently without verifying the allegation. and there were plenty of red flags. take a listen to congressman ken buck. >> we were warned at the time the that we received the document outlining this witness's testimony. we were warned that the
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credibility of this statement was not known. and yet people, my colleagues went out and talked to the public about how this was credible, how it was damning and how it proved president biden's complicity in receiving bribes. it appears to absolutely be false and to really undercut the nature of the charges. we have always been looking for a link between what hunter biden received in terms of money and joe biden's activities or joe biden receiving money. this is not a credible the link at the this point. >> now house oversight committee chairman james comer is down playing the role the informant played in the probe. here he is last night. >> at the end of the day, he wasn't an important part of this investigation. i didn't even know who he was. all knew that alleged bribery. >> funny.
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here's comer just eight months ago. >> this is a very crucial piece of our investigation. and the reason that i think it's very credible is this complaint was made years before they knew about these shell companies and knew what the biden family did in countries like romania and china to get money. >> that is where we start this hour with former assistant director for counterintelligence at the fbi frank, also with me is top prosecutor at the department of justice andrew weisman, and here with me at the table special correspondent and host of the fast politics faft molly john fast. i think a lot of people look at this and they just wonder how it got this far. should there be an accounting of how claims by an informant with ties to russian intelligence ended up being repeated by lekked officials all over the air waves told to millions of
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people. >> let me just say that this is the problem when you have any politician, particularly irresponsible politicians, just taking information without vetting it because they like what's being said. and to give a shoutout to the fbi to frank and my former colleagues that is what they do regardless of whether it's information about hunter biden or whether it's information about misinformant. it did you want matter whether you like or dislike the information. that's not the issue. the issue is how reliable it is and it's not something you play politics with. as frank knows, far better than i do, informants are a difficult and slippery things. you have to be careful about how you use their information. you have to look for history of
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reliability. you have to look for corroboration. and you just don't jump off the so-called cliff with them unless you have that information. whether you think there's something you think is probably right or probably wrong, you have to do your job and you have to do the hard work before you go public. so woor seeing an instance now of grossly irresponsible use of informant by republicans for an investigation that is still in search of facts to support what's going on, but think it's generally true of many people in congress regardless of what aisle they are in. and it's a reason that the fbi and institutions like it arished because they don't play politics. they do look at just the facts in figuring out what's going on.
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whether there should be an investigation or not, i think it's somewhat beside the point because of the timeframe we're in. i don't think anything would get off the ground and would be done. i do think that the representative's point that now that people it's undenial that they know where this information is coming from, if they were to continue using it and go down that road, they are very much showing the formouse transformation of the republican party from one that used to be hawkish with respect to russia, russia disinformation to the grandiose greet yask ambitions of putin to one that is now engages in being a sock for them and engaged in an appeasement or worse.
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>> to underscore that, the house gop was operating at the behest of russian intelligence and vladimir putin. we didn't really rely on this source. if they continue what jim jordan is doing. we're still going down this track, then they are part of a russian intelligence operation. alexander smirnov was a variation of a double agent. at some point, he went south on the fbi. he worked for them for years. he was paid as ab informant, so he was presumably giving up things of value for sure. but he went south. i like to say the more in contact with high-value targets,
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particularly adversarial foreign intelligence targets, the more likely that they could turn on you and become a double. when had that happened, i'd love to know. i'm sure the fbi would love to know i'd like to know whether all the proper procedures were followed for somebody all the operating at this level. meaning was he polygraphed, when was he toly grafd, was there countersurveillance to ensure he was still teling the truth or he was hiding people that he had met with, but not told the bureau about it. then a key question for me is how did members of congress actually get turned on to smirnov. how did they even know to ask about this 1023. and geb, as has been said, the 1023 is a piece of paper thatment documents what someone gave you in terms of
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information. if congress wants to demand a 1023 that says that someone told me the fbi that creatures from mars landed in their backyard, i'm sure there's a 1023 that says that. it doesn't mean you try to impeach a president because of noncredible informs. that's likely behind all of the tension and delay as to why the fbi director seemed so reluctant to give this over it wasn't just ooum giving unredacted report, but also we think this guy is bad. but apparently, members of the gop were not having it. >> it shouldn't surprise us that comer is not calling off this impeachment. >> this had is the gang that can't impeach. they have two impeachments they are running here. and i think it's important to pull back and say they are for high crimes and misdemeanors. even jonathan says you can't
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impeach secretary mayorkas for not doing what i want. so you have these two people, you have this republican party going after two different people for impeachment, neither of which they have a good case. and again, i have said this since the beginning, this is vibe-space impeachment. >> they can't even get the math straight on it. >> there are a lot of questions, as you just laid out, about smirnov and the fbi. there's the question of the 1023 form. i want to underscore something you said, which is you have that sound of ken buck saying that republicans were warned about the credibility of that statement. does it raise alarms to you that even with that warning they chose to continue to proceed. >> the alarm bells are ringing loudly. who was warned, by whom, how and why did they ignore it. two things can be true at the same time.
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i have heard congressman jim jordan say in response to this warning thing. well, we also heard he was credible. yes. if you operate a source and keep it going for ten years, there's a reason or however long this guy was running. he's giving you something of value. and perhaps in corruption or russian organized crime, he was. but at some point, it seems that the russian intel service figured out, hey, smirnov is contact with the fbi. he's a perfect continue wit for disinformation. let's use it. and they jammed him up and he was trying to play both ends against the middle. so yeah, he might have been credible, but if you're warned and you keep going down that path, you are nothing more than an accessory to the russian intelligence service. >> smirnov's allegations created a feeding frenzy on the right. our friends compiled what was said about this intort mant on fox news and other networks. here's a little bit of it. take a listen.
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>> house oversight chairman james comer says he and his colleagues plan to drop a bomb shell. >> it's going to be judgment day tomorrow for the white house. >> you have the confidential fbi informant, who is basically saying that joe biden took $5 million from. >> it was a highly valued human source for the fbi. >> a trusted, highly credible informant, a trusted confidential informant. >> they had a credible source. one of their good sources. >> their most credible paid fbi informant. >> we had had determined the whistleblower is extremely credible. >> details come from an fbi informant who is very trusted. >> a highly reliable informant that's always checked all the information. >> a confidential human source that had been reliable previously to the fbi. >> the confidential human source gave credible information. >> this 1023 is damning. i do a podcast three days a week.
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the podcast has gone into the details. >> putting aside a sitting u.s. senator who takes the opportunity of being on television to remind you that he's trly interested in is his podcast, it turns out that smirnov wasn't credible at all, but he was telling them what they wanted to hear and what they were happy to repeat. the problem is you well know, once that genie is out of the bottle, you can't put it back in. >> one of the things that i think you're hearing from frank and molly and me is in some ways at this point, the worst thing that could happen for the republican house members who are doing this investigation into ill peaching joe biden is if they actually were to impeach and send it no the senate, there's a forum where the senate can look into all the valid and interesting questions that frank has raised about which house
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members, which senate members were told about his lack of credibility that they couldn't confirm it. and get into those details, what did they know about the source of his information. all of that could the just be another example of what molly said. this is the gang that cannot impeach. but this is kind of the thing where they actually need to have people stop digging if you're on the republican side because they really got caught with their hand in the cookie jar here. so i think there's between a lot of rhetoric, fox news, and other forms, but i think the last thing they actually want is an investigation into something that many republicans seem to fear, which is the facts. >> i need not remind you that this is not just about the impeachment that james comer
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desperately wants to prosecute against president biden. this is also about russian interference in past and future elections. you think about the mueller investigation proved russians tried to meddle in if the 2016 election. intel reports that putin tried to interfere in 2020. now smirnov is part of an cam pane ahead of 2024. we sit back and ask have with failed to put a stop to russian meddle thing because republicans welcome the interference. >> you just mentioned the key to the question. when you're up against an ed a investigator sar that's throwing the entire weight of their intelligence services at you, one of the candidates running for president welcomes it as does his party, then things become very difficult. and when far right media platforms reenforce it, spread the disinformation, become that continue wit for anned a very
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sar, then between a rock and a hard place. i have great concerns about the continued attempts of adversaries to try to interfere with this election. it's going to be all hands on deck in the intelligence community. through november and i even have concerns far more narrowly about smirnov himself. he's given up a lot of information that appears to have been valid in the past he's named names in terms of russian intelligence operatives. he's not someone that can walk around freely in terms of vladimir putin's tolerance. and that's part of the problem with letting him go during pending trial. he's in trouble. and he's got access to $6 million. he can't explain where it came from or what he does for a living. he has israeli citizenship and can go back to the israeli consulate and ask for a new passport at any time. it's a problem. >> a deep inhale you did there says it all.
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thank you so much for getting us started. molly is sticking with me. when we come back, republicans knew that when the supreme court overturned roe it would create uncomfortable political realities for them. and now with ivf treatments paused, they are being forced to respond. alabama senator tommy tuberville for one. plus keeping it all in the family. the next likely cochair of the rnc could be the daughter-in-law of the ex-president who plans to turn the committee into a big family account to fund the ex-president's hefty legal bills. and what leaders from it all over the world are telling president biden about how important this election truly is. with democracy literally on the line. all those stories and more when "deadline: white house" continues after this. hite house continues after this your to-do list can be...a lot. ♪♪ [ cellphone whooshes ]
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as cryptonitis for the republican party. now a new issue in the fight has opened up. leaving politicians without a clear answer on the topic. following the alabama supreme court's ruling that frozen embryos created are considered children, are doctors and patients are fearful and uncertain and outraged. watch alabama senator tuberville struggle to answer a question from nbc news this afternoon about what is happening in his own state. >> do you have a reaction to the alabama supreme court ruling on the fact that embryos are children? >> i was all for it. we need to have more kids. we need an opportunity to do that. i thought this was the right thing to do. >> but ivf is the used to create
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children. are you concerned this could impact people trying to have kids? >> that's for another conversation. we need more kids. we need the people the to have the opportunity to have kids. >> what do you say to the women in alabama who no longer have access to ivf? and will not as a result of this? what to you say to them? >> that's a hard one. it really is. because again, you want people to have that opportunity. we need more kids. >> joining me now president of reproductive freedom for all. molly is back with us. many, my goodness, i adopt know if that's a question about not knowing the many ways that people now are able to conceive or if he just has not followed
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this story. either way, your reaction to senator tuberville unaware of not just the consequences, but what this ruling is is even about. >> i have so many reactions. i'll try to distill them. i think they know full well what they are doing. they have been embedded with the extremist right wing evangelical community, tommy tuberville is part of that community. they know full well what they are doing. they have been caught. even kelli ann conway circulated a poll that 86% americans support ivf. they just never thought they would get caught. this is so connected to exactly the same scenario where they are beginning to hide and pretend to moderate their position on abortion because they know it's wildly unpopular. this has always been the end game of this movement. it is here and now. and they don't know how to handle it now that it's been
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exposed. >> you recall when advocates like yourself warned of the overthrow of roe you recall that when that did happen, you warned that something like this alabama ruling would happen and both times there were people who said you're hysterical and overreacting. none of that is going to happen. here we are. talk about why this alabama ruling is just so devastating not just for folks in alabama, but for folks across the country. >> it's devastating because it's not limited to alabama. this is a core foundational belief of the entire gop. there is a life begins at conception bill that was cosponsored by over 120 republicans, including mike johnson, this thing is in congress. nikki haley is now on the record talking about how she believes embryos are babies. this is so embedded.
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the prop 2025 blueprint that the extremist right wing gop leadership are putting forth to be prepared for a trump administration that you have been covering, that's part of that agenda as well. this was a footnote in dobbs. it's been out there in plain sight. as you noted, we had a believability gap around roe falling. and we had this around attacks on ivf. this isn't limited to a bunch of extremists in texas and alabama. it's right here in the leadership of the gop in congress and at the federal level and if the presidential race. >> it's in part why you had this believability gap. will this motivate voters going into the election? it's why you have vice president harris, why you have someone like governor whitmer really speaking to this topic just today. take a listen.
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>> so on the wasn't hand, the proents are saying that an individual doesn't have a right to end an unwanted pregnancy. and on the other hand, the individual does not have a right to start a family. >> they have shown us their next steps. a national abortion ban. put health care providers behind bars, ban emergency contraception, ban birth control, ban ivf, a as we just saw in alabama this week. this is their playbook. >> this is one we don't need to work that hard to create a contrast. >> it's also really scary. i was born in 1978, 5 years after roe v. wade was the law of the land. i did not think that i would be 45 and arguing that contraception should be legal. this has gotten very crazy. i don't think wimp want to live in a country where an embryo has more rights than she does. these embryos are people, but if
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you are having an atopic pregnancy, a lot times we're seeing women said to wait until they are at death's door to get an abortion. so it is clear that these embryos have more rights than women. >> or you have doctors, many on the phone with attorneys who represent their facilities or their hops, i trying to figure out where the law is when they should be focused on making life-affirming decisions. i think about what molly said. this personhood fight, that's been the back trop to all of this. and i don't know exactly -- you want to hear your thoughts, how you message around the forthcoming dangers of what it is they want to do. >> i think we have to be really plain, speak in very clear language to the american people. these folks from donald trump to mike johnson, mitch mcconnell,
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the whole crew, they are all to blame for the crisis. they are responsible. the gop is responsible for the overturning of roe v. wade. it's bad actors in the state houses and supreme courts that are doing these challenging abortion bans and additional rulings like we saw in texas. the list goes on and on. we have to very clearly, as you said, drive the contrast, but define the villains here. they are making it easier for us, but we also have to raise the alarm. there's something folks can do right now this cycle and it's elect joe biden and democrats up and down the tukt to put a stop to this. we do it by pinning this squarely on them. making sure folks understand who is responsible. >> president biden, who you just referenced, said this today about the alabama ruling. the disregard for women's ability to make these decisions for themselves and their families is outrageous and unacceptable. we're fighting for the freedom
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of women, for families, and for doctors who care for these women. and we won't stop until we restore the protections of roe v. wade in federal law for all women in every state. what is next in that fight? >> we have to not only reelect the president and vice president, we have to flip the house, which is why i keep talking about mike johnson ask how not only coplicit, but his leadership in all this. but we have to hold the senate. that's going to be really tough. there's a clear pathway. this issue clears a very clean distinction between our parties. everyone understands this issue and how it's encroaching on their decisions on if women have a family. we have a clear pathway, but it will be very tough. we have to deliver a federal trifecta for joe biden to codify roe. >> thank you so much for taking the time to be with us. up next, the trump family takeover of the rnc. how plans for his daughter-in-law to cochair the
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committee sounds like one big fundraising enterprise with every penny going to him and only him. that story is next. ing to him ad only him that story is next to a child, this is what conflict looks like. children in ukraine are caught in the crossfire of war, forced to flee their homes. a steady stream of refugees has been coming across all day. it's basically cold. lacking clean water and sanitation. exposed to injury, hunger. exhausted and shell shocked from what they've been through. every dollar you give can help bring a meal, a blanket, or simply hope to a child living in conflict. please call or go online to givenowtosave.org today with your gift of $10 a month, that's just $0.33 a day. we cannot forget the children in places like syria, born in refugee camps, playing in refugee camps, thinking of the camps as home.
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please call or go online to givenowtosave.org today with your gift of $10 a month. your gift can help children like ara in afghanistan, where nearly 20 years of conflict have forced the people into extreme poverty. weakened and unable to hold herself up, ara was brought to a save the children's center, where she was diagnosed and treated for severe malnutrition. every dollar helps. please call or go online to givenowtosave.org today with your gift of $10 a month. just $0.33 a day. and thanks to special government grants that are available now, every dollar you give can multiply up to ten times the impact. and when you use your credit card, you'll receive this special save the children tote bag to show you won't forget the children who are living their lives in conflict. every war is a war against children. please give now.
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ohhh crap. now we gotta get france something. wait! we can use etsy's new gift mode! alright. done. ♪♪ plateau de fromage! oh la la! don't panic. gift easy with gift mode, new on etsy. it's odd how in an instant things can transform. slipping out of balance into freefall. i'm glad i found stability amidst it all. gold. standing the test of time. absolutely. that's why you have seen a go fund me get started. that's why people are furious and they see the attacks gen him. it's an attack not just on donald trump, but on this country. >> laura trump, the presumptive
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next cochair of the rnc saying absolutely the republicans will be okay with the committee paying trump's legal bills. she along with michael wattly have been ebb dorsed by her father-in-law as the next cochairs. it appears laura trump is already laying the groundwork for her family's next big rift. last week on newsmax she said all funds the organization raised would go straight to his reelection efforts. and those could include his legal bills. is poised to spend 2024 trying to finance running for president and staying out of prison for the 91 felony charges he currently faces. joining our conversation is former chief of staff at the department of homeland security. molly is back with us. do you think laura trump is right that republican donors are okay with their cash going to trufr's legal bills? >> here's the thing. i would like to say the answer is no, and that most people will
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see through this and turn them off towards donald trump and this will mark the end of his reign over the gop. but i know better than that. i think laura trump probably knows better than we do, that they have so fooled the gop base that their future of the country's tie to dth@that they seem willing to do almost anything to support him. we all remember that level of absurdity that they are tapping into in terms of the cult mentality around donald trump. but there's a couple things here that are significant about it. if the gop turns into a gofundme for donald trump, it's likely to bankrupt candidates that are further down the ticket that will probably result in those candidates losing their elections and bigger losses for the gop. the thing that worries me is is it will help enable donald trump to continue his odyssey to run america. i think that's the big concern
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is that that slush fund, that piggy bank will increase his odds of winning back the white house. >> if you're one of the 18 members of congress that joe biden won in 2020, you're not thrilled that that money is going to be spend on donald trump rath than on a competitive reelection. there are also other structural things. part of the problem the rnc was having, part of the critique is that fundraising wasn't where he wanted it to be. but given that he is now soliciting money for all types of things, where are the dollars then that he sees coming to the rnc? >> again, this is the problem. he's going to remove ron na, who at least has a relationship with republicans, and put in his daughter-in-law, who has never run ab organization like this. and then she's going to have to go back to these donors and say, my father-in-law removed your person, who has been the chair of the rnc since the
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longest-serving chair of the rnc. and she's been reelected four times. and you're going to remove her because you want someone with a trump last name. i think ultimately, what is happening here is we're seeing trump praise prizing loyalty over any kind of efficiecy or political talent. >> just this week it was report ed how trump's pac is racking up more legal bills. it spent another $2.9 million in legal expenses in january. underscoring how his legal woes continue to suck up resources in an election year. the group save america also reports $1.8 million in new debts for legal fees owed to several firms. it's been the primary vehicle for paying trump's legal fees to the tune of more than $50 million. the need here is pretty clear. what is driving this decision is
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obvious. does it work? does he get away with it? >> he's gotten away with an awful lot. i think just to contextualize that, imagine this happened tep years ago when barack obama was president. imagine him mounting a takeover in an effort to use the dnc to pay his personal legal bills. it would be stunning and one of the biggest political scandals in modern american history. and now republicans act like it's a normal request. and it's really, really stunning to see. but for legal observers, i would say if you're interested in some new case law and some potential lawsuits, watch the fec and the trump campaign and watch the rnc over the course of this next cycle. if laura trump becomes the head of it. i have a tough time believing
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they are going to operate that thing in a squeaky clean manner and consistent with campaign finance law. i would not be surprised if you see this corruptions spill over into legal violations, but will that catch up with them in time, i think that remains to be seen. >> just a reminder here which is there could be the option of him just paying for this himself. vanity fair detailed trump's financial situation. if trump continues to spend at the pace he did in 2023, had he will run out of funds he can use for legal fees by the the middle of the year. which noted that this means he will subsequently have to tush to donors of the republican national committee for financial aid. perhaps in preparation for this outcome, trump has sought to fill leadership posts with loyalists including his daughter-in-law laos are trump with a forbes estimated net worth of $2.billion, but is more than capable of self-funding, but he has in the past resisted spending his own money in legal and campaign costs.
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i just want to underscore here he could fund himself. he's chooing not to. >> he could. and i think trump's history shows that he won't. he's got a very long history of everyone from contractors to lawyers to his closest supporters. but the thing that really worried me here, let's imagine for a second that donald trump does win a second term in the white house. he he goes into the white house with massive legal bills and carryover debt from these campaigns. people who would try to rashuate themselves with the president of the united states would know their best way to do that would be to pay down his debt. there's an obvious place where dth could see leverage from the power he has to get personal benefit. that is just a bullseye for potential presidential corruption among the many things that we're already woried about in a second donald trump term.
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>> it's a reminder that the grift bigger consequences. >> the guy is selling $399 sneakers. he's definitely capitalized on this. for sure it's really worrying. but he's always been ethically very on the fence. so i do agree with miles that there really could be larger -- they could get themselves into more legal trouble. >> thank you so much for taking the time to be with us. >> when we come back, breaking news this afternoon. a judge responding to the attempt to delay paying his huge new york civil fraud fine. that development, when we come back. ine. that development, when we come back
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s. the new york judge has officially denied donald trump's request to delay enforcement of the civil fraud penalties against him. he writes in an e-mail to the ex-president's lawyers, you have failed to explain much less justify any basis for a stay. it appears the judge has also signed the judgment. once the clerk enters it, the 30-day clock will start for trump to appeal. trump's bill is getting more expensive by the day. the $355 million he was ordered to pay is acueings interest that adds up to $87,000 per day. unless he wants to pay the full the penalty while his appeal is considered, the ex-president will need to post an appeal bond, which is up to 120% of the judgment plus current interest. that's a lot math.
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let's bring in reporter and contributor sue craig, the author of the forthcoming book "lucky loser." also with me is legal correspondent lisa rubin. molly is back with us. what a title, sue craig. the title is doing a lot of work. we'll loop back to the ways in which this reminds us of that title, but first, lisa, walk us through this latest from the judge. >> the judge was asked to stay the judgment without donald trump having to post a bond. they basically used a technicality in new york civil praks fits saying they should have filed a motion. they didn't file a motion. they should have given us notice. they should have been able to counterpropose a motion. all the attorney general did was reduce my opinion to a short form order. they transformed the words and
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left spaces for the clerk to fill in the interest. what exactly are you objecting to and when trump's lawyers couldn't articulate beyond a small but meaningful error with respect to interest, that was the only real error that they identified. they couldn't come up with anything else. that's when he droed the hammer on them and said enough is enough. you have given me no reason for a stay. and then it appears based on the docket he signed it already. we're waiting for the clerk to start that 30-day clock. >> talk me through what that looks like. >> that 30-day clock is a timeframe for donald trump to post that bond. the judge has control of whether that is 100% or 120% of the judgment. there's also the possibility that donald trump can ask for what's called a limited stay from an appeals kourlt that would allow him to stay in sol limited period of time without posting any bond.
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it's thot clear to me that the appellate division, which is the first level appeals court in new york will have any sympathy with that. i'm not sure what reason they would site other than a cash crunch, which they have been unwilling to say so far. but as you mentioned, interest keeps ticking every day. there are multiple buckets of cash that are part of the award. they have prejudgment interest that starts at different points in time. but the largest bucket in that opinion is $168 million starts march 4th, 2019. that's nearly five yoorz ago. and at $87,500 a day, we are well in access of $450 million already. and that will continue to build until he posts that judgment. >> so there's another hurdle here. this is from cnbc about the hurdles trump faces in securing an athe peels bond. bond agents may have reservations about working with trump, whose business practices and claims about his wealth have been successfully challenged in court. appeal bonds are used to ensure
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that a person ordered to pay a judgment cannot misuse the courts to delay or avoid maiking that payment. who would want, at this point, to work with trump and post his bond? >> it's a good question. we know they are out looking for it. so far, we haven't heard if there's any takers. this market is -- we're learning about it as we go. these are new things for us. there's appeal bonds and who writes them, but they are high risk in these firms. so that's going to be one issue. if he puts up real estate, what real estate is it. but they mean business. they are going to want to see the full amount or more than the full amount. this award is getting larger every day. so i think that's where they ar day. that's where they're at. i think the reason they may have wanted this order not to be signed today is they're just trying to get a bit more time to try to arrange it. the other thing about appeal bonds come with a lot of fees.
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the trump team even commented about that when they put up the award. they decided to put up $5 million in cash, and someone set it's because there's a lot of fees with a bond. from their point of view, they want to get the most advantageous to them, as awful as this situation is. >> so, sue, understand the point you just made, legal eases as we go here, there does seem ton an outstanding question how you enforce a bond against someone who might once again become a vice president. >> i think the company that would go into underwriting that he would be, you know, preparing that's correct working through that with the trump organization. they're going to enforce it. this seems like a pretty rough-and-tumble area of the market. they know what they're doing. they're going to make sure this is solid if they underwrite it.
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>> lisa? >> i was going to say, we saw in the civil fraud trial some evidence that deutsche bank didn't want to extend new loans to the trump organization on the cusp of trump becoming president, because the presidency was a risk for them. even if he can get over the other hurdles, the fact they might have trouble collecting against somebody who is a president, owes just not wanting to be entangled with someone someone who might be the leader of the free world again. . >> ink thank you all for being with you. a quick break and we'll be right back. th you a quick break and we'll be right back
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it's a slap in the face to them, to the victim in the case to refuse to allow us to seek justice. up next for us, it could be the most consequentially election of our time. the case that president biden is making to protect democracy. the next hour of "deadline: white house" starts after this quick break. "deadline: white house" starts after this quick break
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♪♪ for a long time, we told ourselves that american democracy is guaranteed, but it's not. democracy is still at risk.
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this is not hyperbole. it's simple truth. in our bones, we know democracy is at risk. >> democracy itself is in peril. here at home and around the world. >> american's democracy is the most saeb cried cause is the most urgent question of our time. it is 5:00 herein. i'm in no nicolle nicolle. president biden says it a lot, because he means it and because it's true. american democracy is on the line, seeing as biden's likely opponent in the 2024 race is someone willing to take a wrecking ball to it if he were to return to the white house. look at what he's already said and done he's cots yesterday up to dictators, fuel hatred and
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division, and incited a direction against the u.s. government. he's hit at the heart of what makes america america. the rest of the world recollect nices the threat as well. president biden just told donors at a fund-raiser in california, quote -- every single world leader that i've known, and i've known all of them, literally all of them the last 40 years, every single one, when i attend intermeetings now -- not a joke -- grabs my arm and says, you have to win. the election coming up in less than seven meteorologist doubling down that if a nato ally does not pay up, he will not defend them. adam kinzinger went so far to say a tech trump president set, quote would be very devastating for the world order as we know it. it's an issue on the top of americans' minds. a new survey gave people a list of ten issues and asked which is
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the most urgent one? 21% said democracy in the united states, economy 20%, immigration 17%, and 10% gun violence. no other issues reached double digit. that is where we start today, with matthew dowd, ann applebaum, and basil michaels. when he says it's not just your democracy on the line, it is my democracy on the line, what is their core concern? >> let me answer that by quoting a member of the german parliament, who i saw in munich last weekend, who said to me, we are faced with a real prospect now that europe will be facing three autocracies -- russia,
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china and the united states. so, america's traditional allies in europe, asia and elsewhere, are afraid the very nature of america will change. therefore their relationship to the united states, their relationships to one another, their secure relationships, trading relationships. they believe it's a very existential election. i'm sure biden was telling the truth where he says every world leader he meets wants to talk about it. >> the fact, matthew dowd, that you have a world where he see russia, china and the united states in the same camp, how terrifying is that? >> exceedingly. i'll take us all on a short history lesson of the rise of democracy. when world war ii ended there are ten democracies in the world. that number rose every decade unit its height in 2016 of 96
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democracies. so basically the post-world war order at the lead was a rise in democracies all around the world. today there are six less democracies since 2016, since the rise of trump and everything associated with donald trump. we have lost six democracies. our own democracy has moved from a full democracy to a flawed democracy because of the attacks on the rule of law and the attacks on whether or not you'll accept election results here. all of the rise of democracy around the world that we have seen has been stopped, per se, and now we're in great danger of it moving in reverse. all of the issues that people care about around the world and the united states whether it's health carefree dom, gun violence, economic justice, all of those things are dependent on
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the existence of a healthy democracy, and europe completely understands that. >> if you were president biden, basil, how do you speak to the moment? >> you speak to the moment by reminding america how interconnected we are. i was thinking of barack obama traveling the world. he went to germany, to other parts of the world, in a way to unite us and talk about this new vision, this new view of the world under an america that was about to change dramatically, because it was about to election the first african american president. juxtapose that with trump's sneakers. you know, interestingly enough, they're call then the january 6th sneakers. it's sort of funny, but it's not. it reminds us how much that
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insurrection and everything and everyone associated with it is so embedded within us, but it's also a movement to not less anybody forget who is responsible for it. that's incredibly important, whether it's through intentional ignorance or not, donald trump doesn't seem to firmly grasp how interconnected we are in this world, from our financial systems, from our waste treatment, everything is connected. he does not seem to care, and he will plunge the united states into a place where we probably haven't been in 100-plus years, and it's important for joe biden, if not to go through the specifics of that, but to remind everyone how their life will dramatically change under his leadership. >> and there are myriad examples of his america first philosophy. the nato comments is top of mind here. here was the polish foreign minister on "morning joe" today.
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>> nato and the alliance is not a contract with your neighborhood property protection company. article v has only been invoked once, for an attack in the city after 9/11, by all the allies. poland send a brigade first to iraq, and then another one to afghanistan, for a decade. we didn't send an invoice to the united states. it's an alliance that you kind of rhetoric is unhelpful. >> a fundamental understanding of an alliance, i think what's so terrifying beyond the more tangible question of security is, like, who we are as americans, how we identify as a country, as a democracy if we are not willing to stand with our allies. >> i think if you look back at american history, americans like the idea they're doing something good in the world, that we are
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associated with other countries that have some kind of ideals trying to make something better, trying to live in free societies. we were the left and the right of the united states were united in the doled war. not about everything, but certainly the idea that freedom was good and other countries that wanted freedom should be helped. also, the rule of law, that we're a law-abiding society, and we'll ruled by the constitution and judges and not by the whim of a dictators, and we are aligned with other countries ruled that way. i think changing that will change something fundamental. if we are explicitly aligned with rule by law countries, rule by law meaning -- i think you'll find people being confused about who we are and where we belong in the world. i think you're absolutely right to point at this as an
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existential part of what it means to be an american. >> we talk about this as though if it's a question that donald trump gets reelected, putting this vision into action, the truth is even if he's not reelected to a second term, his hay incepted this idea into the american minuteset. who doesn't understand why it's important for our safety. there's still a reckoning forthcoming. >> you're right. for example, if america is no longer the security provider in europe or in south korea or in japan, then there are all kinds of advantages that america has that will disappear. will people go on buying american airplanes or american energy equipment?
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people automatically want to put us first and do things for us first because of the security relationships. if those are gone, then the united states will just be another competing power, not sure if we should trade with them, maybe we should have barriers, tariffs against them. a lot of modern american industry is dependent on those security relationships, two. i think people might need that re-explained. >> i'm just so struck by something that ann was talking about during the cold war, the idea no matter where you are, the honor the idea that freedom was a good thing. the fact that that would ever be something that broke down along partisan or ideological lines is kind of wild. what do you make of this poll that recognizing it as a central issue going into the next election? >> i think the voters get it. they're watching slowly certain
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rights among women, minorities, other populations get eroded. we have not been perfect. we've had to do this for 200 years while we explained it to excluded other people. i think the real problem is, and it's fundamentally not donald trump the person, but basically there's a large segment of the population, let's call it about a third, which i think it is, who don't see democracy as the end goal. they don't see democracy as here's table stakes, we believe in democracy, and let's argue about policy. they only see democracy as a means, and if it doesn't get to what they want, then so much for democracy. that's the scary part. it's not that donald trump believes it might become an autocrat or might establish as authoritarian administration, but he has the backing up about a third of this country that doesn't seen democracy as a
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pillar of who we are. they want to accomplish an end. the end is they're scared of multi-cultural democracy. they're scared of what america looks like, and it's not the way they want it to look. if that means throwing democracy out, they're welcome to it, which is why they get behind donald trump, and which is why around the world, as i know ann can speak for, why authoritarians rise, is they appeal to a certain group of people that can accomplish what they want, regardless of the freedoms and regardless of the democracy that's established. now that is occupied in one political party in america, in an entirety of the republican party in america is now occupied by this view. that's what scary in a two-party country. >> there is, of course, there's what happens in a global setting, also what happens here at home we know donald trump is about revenge and retribution. there was a new piece about how
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people are fearful he will go after them. stephanie grisham has become a sharp critic. she says she and former colleagues are part of a text change have discussed moving to countries with non-extradition treaties. speaking privately to her mother once, her mother tried to reassure her that trump wouldn't have time to revenge. okay, mom. >> i always raise the names of those women in georgia. shay moss and ruby freeman. she says she can't even use her name, and matthew's points earlier, this is what's so interesting and scary. this country has been
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isolationist before. fdr had to try to get the country to roll back some of the that legislation so we could engage more in world war ii. the fear, what we're experiencing is not only donald trump trying to remove us from the national stage and the leadership position around the world, but also focus inwardly, and do everything that matthew is talking about, go after people of color, go after reproductive rights, to do more damage internally than our country has seen in a have i long time. so it feels like he's intentionally saying leave us alone so i can be the dictator i want to be in this country. that's what's so scary. it's focusing us more and more on isolating us from the rest of the world, which i always say no one will help us, we have to help ourselves. that's where we need to vote and
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mobilize. there is a clear attempt to cut us off from everybody. >> i imagine it must be frustrating to travel abroad, to speak to global leaders and have them so clear-eyed about the threat that donald trump poses, and be here at home and people thing you don't need to take him at his word. what is their action item. what is their path forward? what is the course? >> well, for global leaders, the main conversation is, how do we find a way to talk to americans? you know, how do we reach americans. there are several who have talked about -- i know several different people, different countries have talked about maybe not just coming to washington or new york, but texas and louisiana, maybe we snead better ways to reach a broader population. i mean, they're now thinking about how they should be campaigning, some of them are
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strategizing, how do we talk and explain. >> what does that look like? >> they're beginning trying to understand how to do it. it's not their job to do it. it's the jobs of americans who understand this threat and americans who, you know, what the damage could be, it's their respond to stand up, take part in politics. it's more than just voting, but working on polls, working in civic organizations, talking about it as much as possible. we need people to raise awareness and act. matthew, thank you for joining us. ann and basil will continue with us. a closer look at why russia killed the jailed opposition leader, next. why hasn't the united states
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supreme court issued its decision on donald trump's position on immunity? we'll more. and mike lynn del, forced to pay $5 million who easily proved his false claims about the to 20 election wrong. we explain after "deadline: white house" continues after a quick break. don't go anywhere. continues after a quick break. don't go anywhere. biktarvy is a complete, one-pill, once-a-day treatment used for h-i-v in many people whether you're 18 or 80. with one small pill, biktarvy fights h-i-v to help you get to undetectable—and stay there whether you're just starting or replacing your current treatment. research shows that taking h-i-v treatment as prescribed and getting to and staying undetectable prevents transmitting h-i-v through sex. serious side effects can occur, including kidney problems and kidney failure. rare, life-threatening side effects include a buildup of lactic acid and liver problems. do not take biktarvy if you take dofetilide or rifampin. tell your healthcare provider about all the medicines and supplements you take,
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she's going to continue to fight that's underway. we're not letting up. >> that i was president biden this afternoon, following his meeting with the life and daughter of alexi navalny. president biden and much of the world blamed his death directly on putin. president biden prepares to plan major sanctioning to hold russia accountable for navalny's death. any kind of support -- nbc news has learn that his mother was blackmailed, forcing her to hold a secret funeral for his son. ann writes it was an embold under putin, because he was living proof that courage is
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possible, the truth exists, russia could be a different kind of country. for a dictator that survives, that kind of challenge was intolerable. now putin will be forced to fight against navalny's memory. we are back with ann and basil. talk more about his strength, what it was he stood for. >> let me connect this conversation to what we were just talking about a few minutes ago. navalny was someone who sought to model civic courage for russians. he was poisoned by the putin regime, he left the country, and made this decision to come back. he said, i'm a russian, i'm going to be in russia and continue to be active, and he took this huge risk that ended in his death. by doing so, he hoped to inspire people to understand that they too can stand up, they too can do something. they can contribute to change. they can make the country different. that was the significant of him,
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and of course that's why the regime locked him up. they want to prove that that kind of courage and activism will fail. the news about his mother and his body and this horrible idea that they're holding back his body. they even said to her, time is on our side, because the body le decompose. they said we won't give it back to you unless you promise the funeral will be in secret? why? because a public funeral in moscow could create -- a million people could come. they're still afraid of that model of behavior, civic activism, saying what you think, what you believe, acting as if there can really be something that's true in contradick to propaganda. >> that last point there, because you write about it, his able to pierce through the propaganda. talk about that challenge and what the lesson is that can be learned from his ability to
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break through. >> what he understood, you can do investigative reporting, which had had a whole team that did, but it's not enough to just do it, put it in a report and publish it and put it aside. he said, no, we have to commune indicate to people what this means. he could find these extraordinary stories of corruption, an enormous palace with a hockey rink, hooka bars. he did these holy well-style, very high-level, high-production quality documentaries. he showed them to people. he appeared in them himself as an ordinary rack raconteur. he explains how it works, it must be true, and he would is -- literally the last one he did about the palace, 129 million
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views, you know, it was watch something like a few months it came out, something like a third or quarter of russians that had already seen it. 50940% knew of its existence and knew what it was about. he found ways to reach people, to tell them what had happened, and to make it real. he also explained to them, look, it's not just a funny story, look how corrupt a dictator. because he's rich, you don't have good roads. because he's rich, you have terrible health care. he drew lines for people. he connected the dots. that was a really powerful way to be a dissenter in a society like that. >> what is the lesson for other dissidents? for others, learn how to connect the dots. it's not just about, you know, revealing the truth. it's about finding ways to communicate it to people. that, of course is the most different thing. >> that would seem a very relevant lesson.
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>> absolutely. as you're talking, i'm reminded of my youth. it was anti-apartheid. mandela was the movement. not only was that a movement that spread to the diaspora, but i think about that, because we're and a half similar situation navalny. his ability to speak to the masses and perhaps his death, his murder becomes the charge for a difficult kind of movement. i think about my youth, in the '80s it was the cold war, and there was no way we would be coddling russia, but now we have this relationship between putin and donald trump, and perhaps similar to what i experienced in the anti-apart tide movement we'll have today, regardless of what donald trump wants to do to
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create this more isolationist america, that the people will speak ahead of him, stronger than him. hopefully that kind of movement and mobilization around the world kind of helps to mitigate and nullify what donald trump is trying to do. >> we're still waiting to see what the sanctions package will look like. is there anything significant enough to hold putin accountability? >> there are two things. number one, take the frozen assets, $300 billion of frozen assets, and release if for the use of ukraine. this was money that was frozen at the time of the war. most of the money is in europe, not the u.s., but the u.s. could lead to persuade the allies to do that. u.s. congress could pass on legislation for aid for ukraine. putin is desperate for us to end this war.
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he's paying an enormous price. what an incredible piece, anne applebaum, and thank you, basil smikle. and we are move about the fbi agency accused of making up stories about president biden. stories about president biden. if you struggle with cpap... you should check out inspire. honey? inspire. sleep apnea innovation. learn more and view important safety information at inspiresleep.com
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we brought you in the last hour. the former fbi informant charged
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with making false allegations to federal officials, alexander smirnov has been arrested again. tom winter, walk me through the sequence of what happened here. >> according to his attorneys, this morning they're meeting at their office going over legal strategy. he's there for a legal consultation, and federal agents show up, present a signed warning out of the central district of california, and take him back into custody. what is so odd is there's been no filings whatsoever in the -- in that particular docket in california. as you'll remember jed, just a little over 25 hours ago, we were still sitting here, refreshing that same docket, trying to determine if a judge would say, yes, let's have a hearing, we'll revisit this issue of him being out on bail pending his trial. there is nothing in here that indicates initially the judge
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revisited this issue at all, let alone signed off. now, according to his attorneys, it's for the same indictment and the same charges, so it would not be totally unusual for me if i heard about this happening, and that there was a super ceding indictments or additional charges since he had been arrested, approximately a week ago. it's interesting to me that this happened. it appears to have happened quite quickly, and i think we'll get documentation quickly. >> what is the documentation you're looking for? >> was there an emergency remand request from prosecutors, basically say there's new information we have learned that he is up to, that's apart from what we have charged, but there are reasons we believe he needs to be taken off the street and needs to be taken off the street right now. that is something that we do not see very often. prosecutors have the ability to go to the judge and ask for that
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sort of thing. basically it will be something to believe them there was a threat of him leaving the country or things he was up to. again, we'll have to wait for all the documentation. there could be things i'm not even thinking of that could be behind this. >> i understand all of this has happened raply. 25 hours talking about this case, how is it likely to proceed from this point? >> it's clear that the judge in california has gotten involved. they directly went to the circuit judge. they have gone to the judge where this case will reference eventually be tried. i haven't had -- so, that is information is in there. they have clearly gotten involved on in a level. obviously there's been something here that's led them to believe this person needs to be taken off the streets right now. previously they called him a ser
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flight risk. they had concern before, but was there something that tripped that wire? >> tom winter, as always, thank you for the breaking news. when we return, why we are still waiting for the supreme court to issue a decision on the disgraced ex-president's claims of immunity. ex-president's clai of immunity.
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(fisher investments) no. we have a simple management fee structured so we do better when our clients do better. (other money manager) huh, we're more different than i thought! (fisher investments) at fisher investments, we're clearly different. .. it's now been over a week since donald trump asked the supreme court to block enforcement of the ruling that
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he lacks immunity in the january 6th cases. why haven't we heard from the justices yet? rather, an application to keep that ruling from taking effect. if it takes effect add it goes ban to judge chutkan for trial. the justices could simply grant or deny the application, reuben address, quote, granting it would punt the case indefinitely into the future and imperil the chances of a trial before the november election. former lead investigators, tim heafey, and legal correspondent lo lisa reuben. i wonder what you think is going on beyond the scenes here.
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>> i respect jordan, it's a moment out they're moving very quickly. they asked the special counsel's response within a week of the former president's request. this is moving relatively quickly, even though to people who don't follow the supreme court, likes lisa does, like nerdy lawyers like we do, it seems slow. i think they're getting their time. i don't think it means they're more likely to take the case or for there to be a delay. >> lisa, my nerdy lawyer. trump hasn't filed an appeal. >> he hasn't. >> is it possible the judges are treating this like an appeal. >> they can. they can convert a stay motion like the one he filed on
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february 12th, into a pet of certiorari. >> they could deny the stay and do notion else. they could deny the stay and set an expedited schedule for briefs, or they could treat this stay motion as if it is the cert petition and schedule organ argument. this is not the first time we came to the supreme court. in december, jack smith's office was what you call cert before judgment. that's when you ask the supreme court to leapfrog. immediate appellate court. they were denied. it took them 11 days to do from when the request was made to denying the request. we're at the ten-day mark from when donald trump moved to stay
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on february 12th to today. >> i will admit i'm one of the field who aspires to breezy, like, take your time, no pressure about life in general. on this one there are real consequences to the passage of time. i want to real what constitutional law scholar lawrence tribe wrote. but every additional day of silence increases the odds that the news isn't good for anyone who wants the shocking conduct to be adjudicated before the 2024 election. i wonder if you agree, that every day of silence imperils this case of going to trial? >> it imperils of this case going to trial quickly. >> yes. >> i agree on both camps with professor tribe. i don't think we can divine a substantive view from the delay, but it's not getting rescheduled. as lisa just said, the court
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could deny the request for stay, regardless of what it does or doesn't do on the merits. it can sea, judge, go ahead and set the case for trial. every day that hasn't happened is a good day for defendant trump. he obviously would this to push this back as far as possible. every day that goes by, where the case is not back on a trial, once that switch it flipped, judge chutkan will set a date, then the parties will start preparing for trial. i don't see any other embedment for getting that trial out of the gate, once this immunity question before the supreme court on the stay is resolved. >> on the one hand, lisa, i understand the enormity of what it is they're being asked to reckon with. on the other hand, time is of the essence on what will be a very consequential decision. >> that could be why we're still
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waiting. i agree with tim, you can't read the result into the delay. what i do think is happening is somebody is writing a dissent from whatever that decision is. it takes five votes to grant a stay. irrespective of where that comes out, the fab we're still here a week after the reply brief, suggests that somebody has a chance to get it -- >> is there a chance we'll get it tomorrow. >> i think there. i'm glad you ask me that. a lot of miscellaneous orders have come on fridays. we also know the court conferences on friday. trump's reply brief was announced last thursday. so they could have last friday conference, if they do it tomorrow, and we hear from them soon after. >> just walk me through real
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quickly the best-case scenario for this case if it's allowed to proceed. >> the best case scenario is the supreme court actually interprets this request as a motion for cert, says we're not wading into this, we don't believe it -- it's essentially them ampling the d.c. circuit. that ends the immunity issue, at least at this point. it goes back to judge chutkan and she'll immediately set it for fril. the next best in terms of urgency, would be for the court to denied the stay. that gets it back to judge chutkan's schedule, but it leaves the opening down the road whether they will revisit in. and then, look. scheduling trials with lawyers and other matters is complicated. judge chutkan and the special counsel will want in on the
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calendar as soon as possible. whether that is may, early june, i think it's likely, best case, but that's hard to tell. >> tim heaphy, and lisa reuben, i will frantically think of both of you tomorrow. follow the qr code you see right there on the screen. i sign up, you get a fresh newsletter with all the biggest stories in your inbox tomorrow. when we return, account 5b89 for a big lie. why a judge ordered the my pillow guy, mike lindell, to pay up. lynnindell, to pay up what stuck out to me most was there was no celebrity endorser. the testimonials were from real people. what cancer took from me, golo gave back.
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now, mike, if someone comes forward and says this is b.s., and i'm going to show you why, and he's going to show what you're showing is in and out the truth and invalid, you're going to give him the time to speak and show the evidence, this is person will get $5 million, right? >> $5 million at that symposium. it will be livestreamed on tv. that's why we put up -- i put up the $5 million myself. my pillow guy learning the lesson the hard way. you better be careful what comes out of your mouth. he called it the "prove mike
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wrong" challenge. and wouldn't you know it, someone proved it. now after a ruling from a federal judge affirming an earlier decision, he has 30 days to pony up $5 million to a nevada computer forensic expert who voted for donald trump twice. joining us is tim. you know, life comes at you fast. >> it does. was that judge judy or judge joe brown? >> i hope he has a lot of pillows to sell. a good life lesson alicia, if you get invited on the glasov group, that's something to stay away from. it is easy to, and i'll continue to mock mike lindell, because
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it's fun. i'm glad to the guy that got the $5 million. this guy was in the white house, as crazy as it is, the pillow salesman was in the white house, in the oval office, talking to the president of the united states about a coup between the election and january 6th. so, you know, it's important that people that mess with fire get burned. he's gotten burned a few times, i think. this is just the latest. >> it gets even wilder. this is from "the washington post." he testified at arbitration he did not share key data to support the foreign incursion day, after a man seeking a selfie poked him in the side as the symposium, an act he called an assault, and took it as a signal the government may tamper with his central evidence, and his red team advisers warned him
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against making that -- it could be a poison pill put in the data and we shouldn't release -- it's a bed like reading mad libs, to be honest. to sort of point the finger as a type of election interference that was not happening, while avoiding that which was. >> that was tough to follow. a deep state person was poking him and going to taken the secret information? >> yeah. >> this is something i used to -- i monitor steve bannon's show, and there was a theory they were putting us about about us in reality we are forming a mass sigh psychosis, and i think that was projection. it seems like this person is suffering a psychosis, and he spread his personal sigh psychosis to a dangerous amount of people, way too many who have bought into this, and i think
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that eventually you got to buy your own b.s. and you're making a $5 million offer you can't follow through on. the supreme court declined to take up an appellate from trump lawyers, lie sydney powell, people like linwood. you're starting to see accountability in all different forms for people who carried his water. >> this is -- so, on the one hand, this is good and i'm happy there's accountability. on the other hand, it does hit home how striking it is that people are getting back on board for this for another round. >> yes. yes. >> i just don't understand. the people working for trump right now, alina haba, and his campaign staff. don't they like at all these people thinking this is going to be me if i stick with this guy? that's what's so stressful.
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>> thank for you that reminder. tim miller, as always, thank you for spending time with us. we'll sneak in a quick break and we'll be right back. us. we'll sneak in a quick break and we'll be right back. t-mobile built a 5g network so powerful, it goes beyond the expected. and now, t-mobile 5g internet for homes and businesses is here. also, here... here... here... here... even here. whatever shape your home or business is, t-mobile is bringing high speed internet to towns across america. only 15 minutes to set up. and just $50 bucks a month with no exploding bills or annual contracts. my life is full of questions...
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in just a few minutes, an uncrewed spacecraft is set to land on the surface of the moon. if successful, it would be the first landon since 1972, and first successful landing by a private company. it was built by a houston company, but nasa is streaming the landing live, and some $118 million in scientific supplies up with the craft, hope to
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assess the environment of the moon's south pole. avalancing a week ago, tell attempt to land near the south pole, in order to get to an area where ice and water has been detected, which astronauts could use for oxygen, even fuel. the company estimates had has about an 80% chance of landing, we are always so grateful. "the beat" with ari melber starts right now. welcome, everyone, to "the beat." i'm ari melber. it is february 2024. as we started show here, our top story in 2024 is about a crackdown on women's rights that

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